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In its scale and complexity, El hombre con el hacha y otras situaciones breves – Venecia 2017 is one of Liliana Porter’s most ambitious projects to date. The piece serves as a form of retrospective, as it contains many of the characters, groupings, or situations that have appeared repeatedly in Porter’s works over the last three decades. The installation takes its name from the tiny figure of a man with an axe, shown hacking away at an elongated pile of fragmented objects. In a world where we are increasingly from one place and living in another, and in a city like Miami that is populated with many immigrants and travelers, Porter’s philosophical reflections resonate strongly, while they simultaneously and persistently confound. Times Read: 0

Over the course of more than 30 years, Arthur Jafa (b. 1960, Tupelo, Mississippi; lives in New York) has examined prevailing assumptions about race and identity through an interdisciplinary practice that combines film, installation, sculpture, and performance. His much-celebrated 2016 video Love is the Message, the Message is Death (recently acquired by Pérez Art Museum Miami through the PAMM Collectors Council) captures the powerful emotions that underlie the African American experience, past and present. Encompassing scenes of heightened beauty and humor, as well as instances of horrific violence, the work testifies to the immense cultural achievements of African Americans while alluding to the pain and suffering that black people have endured throughout this country’s history. The artist set the video to the soaring, gospel-inspired 2016 song “Ultralight Beam” by Kanye West, the lyrics of which redouble the sense of hope, suffering, and transcendence that envelops Jafa’s landmark creation. Times Read: 0

This exhibition examines the paintings of Miami-based artist Lynne Golob Gelfman in relation to the Modernist tradition of the grid. Through repetition of both linear and geometric forms, the artist’s diverse series reveal her interest in late-modernist explorations of this rectilinear form, while concurrently evidencing her resistance to its formal rules and cool abstraction, through her references to non-western aesthetics and both the urban and natural environment of Miami. Times Read: 0

Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) presents Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Surrounded Islands, Biscayne Bay, Greater Miami, Florida, 1980-83: A Documentary Exhibition, an exhibition of archival materials and artworks around the renowned artists’ site-specific 1983 installation, Surrounded Islands, in Miami’s Biscayne Bay. On view from October 5, 2018 through February 17, 2019, the exhibition commemorates the 35th anniversary of Surrounded Islands—an anniversary that also coincides with the founding of PAMM’s predecessor institution, Center for Fine Arts. The history of Surrounded Islands is inseparable from PAMM’s origins, and the exhibition reinforces the idea that the museum’s evolution is inextricable from the development of Miami as both a city and an artistic hub. Times Read: 0

Ebony G. Patterson . . . while the dew is still on the roses . . . presents the work of Kingston-born artist Ebony G. Patterson (b. 1981). The most significant presentation of the artist’s work to date, the project includes examples of the artist’s work produced over the last five years, embedded within a new installation environment that references a night garden. Known for her drawings, tapestries, videos, sculptures and installations that involve surfaces layered with flowers, glitter, lace and beads, Patterson’s works investigate forms of embellishment as they relate to youth culture within disenfranchised communities. Her neo-baroque works address violence, masculinity, “bling,” visibility and invisibility within the post-colonial context of her native Jamaica and within black youth culture globally. This exhibition focuses on the role that gardens have played in her practice, referenced as spaces of both beauty and burial; environments filled with fleeting aesthetics and mourning. Times Read: 0

Felice Grodin: Invasive Species is a virtually interactive, digital exhibition of commissioned works by Miami-based artist Felice Grodin. The series employs the immersive technology of augmented reality (AR), and is accessible to visitors using iOS devices in PAMM’s outdoor areas and in the Padma and Raj Vattikuti Learning Theater on the museum’s first floor. This AR project is made possible thanks to a generous grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Influenced by geophilosophy—a field of thought shaped by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari that analyzes the relationship between physical and mental territories—Grodin draws on her training as an architect to explore the mutable within landscape, architecture, and her urban surroundings. Felice Grodin: Invasive Species interacts with PAMM’s architecture, evolving and transforming the museum’s environment for the duration of the exhibition. Featuring a total of four digital works, the show launches with two AR site-specific works—Mezzbug and Terrafish (both 2017)—that engage with and virtually enhance the museum’s building. In Terrafish, Grodin overlaps PAMM’s hanging gardens on the waterfront terrace with the translucent body of a digital species she created, which is suggestive of non-native jellyfish found in South Florida waters. By drawing on the destructive impact of invasive species and creating a new digital environment, Grodin highlights the transformative and unstable state of our ecosystem, speculating about a not-so-distant future affected by climate change and overtaken by uncanny creatures. Felice Grodin: Invasive Species is an augmented reality exhibition that can be viewed via the PAMM App which is available for free from the App Store on iPhone or iPad. iOS 11.0 or later. […]