Easter in Miami 2020 7 Top Choices

Easter Weekend 2020 in Miami has a lot to offer for events, dining and more. Enjoy an Easter Sunday brunch in Miami or check out one of the family friendly events for Easter. Be sure to check out the local Miami Florida events guide to find the perfect plans for Easter Weekend.

Easter Sunday Restaurants in Miami/South Florida

Celebrate Easter Sunday on April 12, 2020, by enjoying a special brunch at a restaurant.

Whether you’re looking for an intimate affair to share with close family, or an out-of-doors afternoon spent soaking in the springtime with mimosas and eggs Benedict, check out GAYOT’s picks for the Top Easter Brunch Restaurants in Miami/South Florida, presented in alphabetical order.

Area 31

Area 31 – The name of EPIC Hotel’s Area 31 does not refer to the floor this spot occupies (it’s on 16). Instead, the name is a reference to Fishing Area 31, the massive expanse of Atlantic/Gulf/Caribbean waters from which many of the restaurant’s sustainable species of fish and shellfish hail. Executive chef Wolfgang Birk presents a menu that ranges from crudo (grouper ceviche with green papaya) to small plates (grilled octopus with pickled red onion) to mains like pork belly fried quinoa and seared snapper with fennel. Our pick, though, would be seating on the outdoor terrace by the glass railing with the skyscraper-to-bay views, a perfect backdrop for cocktails such as the Blinker, mixing Wild Turkey rye with grapefruit juice.

 

Celebrity chef and restaurateur Michael Mina is behind this posh steakhouse designed by Tony Chi featuring butter-poached Prime cuts finished in the flames of a wood grill, and accompanied by bourbon steak sauce. Executive chef Gabe Fenton adds seasonal seafood specials like pan-seared local snapper and grilled tiger prawns. Carnivores come for the 16-ounce Kansas City strip; 10-ounce grass-fed Florida Wagyu filet mignon; and the famed off-menu burger with duck fat fries and a Jim Beam adult milkshake. Don't overlook the Maine lobster potpie or Hudson Valley foie gras, however. Desserts feature a roasted white chocolate bread pudding, espresso panna cotta or house baked beignets with 18-year Macallan butterscotch for dipping. The wine list is extensive and mostly expensive, but does include a "sommelier's secret values" section of boutique bottles, some in the $40-$50 range.Bourbon Steak – Celebrity chef and restaurateur Michael Mina is behind this posh steakhouse designed by Tony Chi featuring butter-poached Prime cuts finished in the flames of a wood grill, and accompanied by bourbon steak sauce. Executive chef Gabe Fenton adds seasonal seafood specials like pan-seared local snapper and grilled tiger prawns. Carnivores come for the 16-ounce Kansas City strip; 10-ounce grass-fed Florida Wagyu filet mignon; and the famed off-menu burger with duck fat fries and a Jim Beam adult milkshake. Don’t overlook the Maine lobster potpie or Hudson Valley foie gras, however. Desserts feature a roasted white chocolate bread pudding, espresso panna cotta or house baked beignets with 18-year Macallan butterscotch for dipping. The wine list is extensive and mostly expensive, but does include a “sommelier’s secret values” section of boutique bottles, some in the $40-$50 range.

cafe-boulud-palm-beach

Café Boulud – Restaurateur Daniel Boulud lends his name to this outpost of his empire in the historic Brazilian Court hotel just steps from swanky Worth Avenue in Palm Beach. The dining room glows in canary yellow, amber and terracotta tones with white linen on the tables. Or dine on the outdoor terrace with a gurgling fountain and potted palms. Executive chef Rick Mace oversees the menu that includes French classics such as coq au vin; seasonal specials inspired by the farmers market (ratatouille with herb pistou or carrot gazpacho with yogurt); and interpretations of global dishes like Vietnamese-style caramelized salmon and risotto with royal red shrimp and pecorino. Conclude your meal with Key lime panna cotta with graham cracker streusel. The 400-bottle wine list spans the globe with an American and French focus and 18 pours by the glass.

Edge Steak & Bar – Edge Steak & Bar is the Four Seasons Hotel Miami’s glamorous steakhouse, but it also offers seasonal seafood, some of it from local waters, and utilizes herbs from a terrace on the property. Australian-born chef Aaron Brooks creates crowd-pleasing American fusion fare. Seafood as well as meat tartares are signatures, including a sampler of beef, corvina, tuna and octopus. Grazers can put together a meal from starters like polenta with Key West pink shrimp; grilled lamb chops with pine nut purée; or crisp pork belly with Brussels sprouts slaw and mango mustard. Grass-fed beef from Creekstone Farms in Arkansas is charbroiled at 1,800 degrees with “cutting edge” rubs. Try the bone-in tomahawk or prime rib steak with béarnaise. For dessert, consider braised apples with spice cake and lemon cream. A thoughtfully chosen global wine list presents expected classics but also offers unusual selections from regions not represented at most Miami restaurants, like Greece’s elegant yet muscular 2007 Megas Oenos red.

Jaya – The Setai has long been a South Beach staple. The restaurant took a Mediterranean turn with French chef Mathias Gervais at the helm, and now it has gone back to its Asian roots with Jaya. The menu is an amalgamation of traditional flavors and influences from Thailand, Vietnam, Korea, India, China and Japan, approached and executed in a modern way. Start with a cocktail (preferably the lychee martini) and some naan. Then move on to appetizers of cloud-like pork belly bao buns, hamachi, hot-and-sour chicken wings crowned with salted mango, Wagyu tataki with truffle ponzu dressing, or one of four dim sum offerings (like the steamed scallops with truffle cream emulsion). Entrées include Peking duck, tandoor sea bass, Kurobuta pork curry, pad thai and basmati rice. For dessert, it’s a tossup between the whiskey miso caramel almond bread pudding with honey banana gelato or nougat glace with pistachio powder and nitro-smoked cherry foam.

Juvia This indoor/outdoor penthouse restaurant’s design is by Venezuelan architect/interior designer Alejandro Barrios-Carrero, with lush “vertical gardens” by French botanist Patrick Blanc. Indeed, the water and city views, especially from the outdoor patio, showcase SoBe at its most glamorous.Gilles Epié has left his position of executive chef. The menu continues to feature influences from French, Japanese and Peruvian cuisines. Diners can start off with composed cold seafood small plates plus raw bar items, the latter available with a choice of beautifully balanced sauces. Small plate highlights include a hamachi espuma crudo, delicate yellowtail petals topped with a foam that’s both citrusy and satisfyingly creamy. Entrées and other cooked dishes range from sake and soy marinated Chilean sea bass with crispy leeks to braised beef stew with mashed potatoes to Korean marinated short ribs from the charcoal grill. The wine list, while not among Miami’s most extensive, is carefully chosen to pair well with the food. But it’s trendy cocktails that rule. As for desserts, chocoholics will appreciate the gold leaf-decorated “candy bar.”

All these are estimated prices and are subject to change. Please be aware that these are prime locations, so reservations are recommended and in some cases, required!