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D-Wade, Chris Bosh, and the Miami HEAT are putting on the NBA’s biggest, baddest show, right here at AmericanAirlines Arena. The best way for you to get in on the action is to buy your tickets right now by choosing from our wide range of choices below. Bring your friends and family out to the party, and check out all the action and excitement of the HEAT Experience. Heat will face Spurs on Tuesday, March 31th at 8.00 PM   Times Read: 0

Back by popular demand, Jazz in the Gables offers a break from the work week with free lunchtime concerts on the Coral Gables Museum plaza located on Salzedo Street two blocks north of Miracle Mile. The concerts, which take place every Wednesday from January 14 through April 1, showcase a different talented jazz performer or ensemble each week. Catering by Lovables will offer box lunches for sale on-site during each performance. Jazz in the Gables is a collaboration between the City of Coral Gables, the Coral Gables Museum, the Business Improvement District, the Chamber of Commerce and the Miami Jazz Coop. Times Read: 0

It’s one colossal party on ice, with all your favorite Disney friends at Disney On Ice presents Let’s Celebrate! Presented by Yo Kids Organic Yogurt. Join Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald and Goofy as they celebrate a Very Merry Unbirthday Party with Alice and the Mad Hatter; a Royal Valentine’s Day Ball with your favorite Disney Princesses, including Cinderella, Ariel, Belle and Tiana; a Hawaiian luau with Lilo & Stitch; a whole new world with Jasmine and Aladdin; a winter wonderland with Woody, Jessie and Buzz Lightyear; a Halloween haunt with the Disney villains and more in a magical medley of holidays, celebrations and festivities from around the globe.  Come join the celebration you’ve been waiting for when Disney On Ice presents Let’s Celebrate! skates into your hometown! Times Read: 0

In conjunction with her PAMM exhibition, Iman Issa will discuss her new series Heritage Studies in which she reimagines historical objects and explores the shifting interactions between artworks, language, history and display. Issa will speak about her reasons for undertaking these formal reinterpretations and the manner through which the generation of forms can affect and utilize the past and its material. The talk will delve into some of her previous projects and will include video and audio screenings. It will be followed by a discussion with exhibition curator Diana Nawi. Times Read: 0

Let’s say it right out: it’s impossible to be in love or to be in love with movies without having a very special place in your heart for In The Mood For Love. Wong Kar Wai’s masterpiece is a triumph of style and substance. Hong Kong, 1962: On the same day, journalist Chow (Tony Leung) and Su (Maggie Cheung), a secretary in a shipping company, become next-door neighbors in a small apartment building. We never see their spouses, but physical proximity draw Chow and Su together. They discover the ties that bind them are many. Everything about the movie is picture-perfect, from William Chang’s Art Direction and Costumes, to Christopher Doyle’s lustrous, languorous cinematography, to Michael Galasso’s Original Score, to the smoldering performances by the two leads. Drenched in unsparing rainfall, everything happens as in a fevered dream. In The Mood For Love went on to win, at home and abroad, far too many accolades to list singly. Leonard Cohen was right: “Ain’t No Cure For Love”. Times Read: 0

Peter Eötvös is a foremost Hungarian composer and conductor. Alongside his theatrical Chinese Opera, da capo—in its U.S. premiere— deftly reimagines themes by Mozart while featuring a cimbalom. Nicknamed “the national instrument of Hungary,” the stringed cimbalom is cousin to the dulcimer and has gained its resurgence from contemporary composers and film scores. Avant-garde visionary Karl Stockhausen produced a half-century of influential and sometimes controversial works. In its U.S. premiere, his groundbreaking Points embraces amplification as singular spots become swarms of sound. Times Read: 0

The Secret Celluloid Society presents John Travolta’s groovy dance film Saturday Night Fever as part of our After Hours series at the Gables Cinema. Brooklyn teenager Tony Manero (John Travolta) lives for Saturday nights at the local disco, where he’s king of the club, thanks to his stylish moves on the dance floor. But outside the club, Tony’s life is not so spectacular. Tony fights constantly with his father and has to compete with his family’s starry-eyed view of his older brother, a priest. However, things begin to change when he spies Stephanie Mangano (Karen Lynn Gorney) in the disco and starts training with her for the club’s dance competition. Stephanie dreams of the world beyond Brooklyn, and her plans to move to Manhattan change Tony’s life forever. Gene Siskelof the Chicago Tribune says “One minute into Saturday Night Fever you know this picture is onto something!” Times Read: 0

Let’s say it right out: it’s impossible to be in love or to be in love with movies without having a very special place in your heart for In The Mood For Love. Wong Kar Wai’s masterpiece is a triumph of style and substance. Hong Kong, 1962: On the same day, journalist Chow (Tony Leung) and Su (Maggie Cheung), a secretary in a shipping company, become next-door neighbors in a small apartment building. We never see their spouses, but physical proximity draw Chow and Su together. They discover the ties that bind them are many. Everything about the movie is picture-perfect, from William Chang’s Art Direction and Costumes, to Christopher Doyle’s lustrous, languorous cinematography, to Michael Galasso’s Original Score, to the smoldering performances by the two leads. Drenched in unsparing rainfall, everything happens as in a fevered dream. In The Mood For Love went on to win, at home and abroad, far too many accolades to list singly. Leonard Cohen was right: “Ain’t No Cure For Love”. Times Read: 0

Presented in the intimate SunTrust Pavilion, this Solo Spotlight features first-year Viola Fellow Hannah Nicholas in an exciting recital program specifically designed for this event. Times Read: 0

The world’s premier classical Chinese dance and music companies, returns to the Arsht Center stage, with a lavishly colorful and exhilarating show, all new for 2015! Shen Yun uses performing arts to present stories that bring to life the inner essence of China. This includes ancient legends, characters, and tales from history, and representative events from the modern world. In Shen Yun performances, themes like spiritual devotion, the benevolence of gods, good and evil, retribution, and the search for the meaning of life have appeared in dance stories and lyrics. Shen Yun Performing Arts presents classical Chinese dance, song, and music with choreography ranging from grand processions to legions of thunderous drums, with gorgeously costumed dancers moving in synchronized patterns. Spectacular visuals take you to another world, with landscapes and ancient buildings appearing on beautiful animated backdrops. Music seamlessly combines the best of the East and West, giving each performance an unmistakable flair. Times Read: 0

Following the smash hit, Death and Harry Houdini, third generation magician Dennis Watkins reappears in THE MAGNIFICENTS. This original story by Watkins features an extraordinary family that brings magical entertainment to adoring audiences. As their glory and popularity begin to fade, the aging star of the show takes a young boy under his wing and teaches him all his tricks – and much more. This touching story of the legacy we can leave before we let go is told in spectacular style, with aerial circus arts, film components and stunning feats of magic – including Watkins vanishing before the audience’s very eyes! Times Read: 0

Art critic and poet Barry Schwabsky speaks about ideas relevant to painting today with specific examples from Victoria Gitman’s exhibition Desiring Eye. For a long time now, painting has been more concerned with the image rather than with representation–that is, with its own construction rather than the construction of resemblances to the observed world. Lately, however, a number of younger painters–Victoria Gitman among them–have rediscovered the observation and transcription of appearances as a powerful resource for painting, and they are doing so without giving up the self-reflectiveness, intellectual lucidity, and emotional content the art gained through a century of cubism, expressionism, abstraction and so on. Schwabsky, art critic for The Nation and contributor to Artforum, has authored several books including Vitamin P: New Perspectives in Painting (2002) and his latest collection of essays Words For Art: Criticism, History, Theory, Practice (2013). Times Read: 0