Christmas vacation. Not so long ago … . An ironically comic look at Manhattan’s endangered debutante scene, Metropolitan chronicles the rise and ultimate decline of a group of young Park Avenue socialites who gather nightly to discuss love, honor and the impending demise of their class. Director Whit Stillman’s deft, literate dialogue and hilariously highbrow observations earned this first film an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay among accolades too numerous to mention; an American original was born. Upon its release, Roger Ebert wrote: “[Stillman] has made a film Scott Fitzgerald might have been comfortable with, a film about people covering their own insecurities with a façade of social ease. … Everything that happens is felt deeply because the characters in this movie are still too young to have perfected their defenses against life. They care very deeply about what others think of them, their feelings are easily hurt, their love affairs are really forms of asking for acceptance.” Writes Mark Rozzo in (where else?) Vanity Fair: “Twenty-five years later, in the era of the 1 percent … the film feels like anything but a faded cotillion corsage; it’s as crisp as ever.”